Category Archives: Dock Inspections

3 Common Dock Repair Problems and Fixes

Routine dock inspections can help your waterfront investment last long after its installation. When you can catch minor dock repair issues early, you’re protecting yourself from more costly projects down the road. If you aren’t sure what to look for, these common dock repair issues are a good place to start.

Common Dock Repair Issues

Your water fluctuation, build process, and how your dock does in winter all play a role in what kind of repairs your dock might need. Just keep in mind, every dock has its own unique characteristics. Wooden docks will have different concerns than a stationary aluminum dock. Custom floating docks are different still.

1. Dock Deck Splintering

For wood docks, one of the biggest issues we see are that the deck boards start to splinter. Fortunately, this can be a relatively easy fix. You might need to sand down certain sections to prevent further breaks. In other cases, you might need to replace the entire board.

Obviously wood docks don’t last forever, but staying on top of the smaller dock repairs can help it stay sturdy through the upcoming seasons. If you want to avoid these maintenance details, you can always upgrade your dock to composite boards. These materials won’t splinter, plus they still have that natural look with a wood-like texture and design.

2. Dock Frames Rusting

Just as dock boards can splinter, other materials on your dock can have their own issues. Some types of docks can run into problems with their metal parts rusting. That’s why it’s so important to do regular checks for signs of rust around your dock. A quick inspection for rusted frames can help you feel better about your waterfront setup—and keep you safe!

If you see any problems around your dock frames, you’ll probably want to call on a local dock builder or waterfront company to come take a closer look. You might only need to replace a few parts for broken or rusted bolts. Then again, it might be time to upgrade your frame. Rust around your dock means it’s just a matter of time before something gets worse or snaps.

3. Dock Floats Sinking

Dealing with a floating dock means you might need to replace a float here or there over the years. On the bright side, these issues are pretty easy to spot. Noticing a sinking section is usually a clear sign that something is going on underneath your dock.

Reviewing the warranty for your encapsulated dock can help keep your repair costs to a minimum. You should also be able to reach out to your local dock builder to see if they can research that information for you.

Turn to Deaton’s for Dock Repairs!

Whenever you run into problems with these common dock repair questions, you can always count on our crew at Deaton’s Waterfront Services. Some dock repairs are easy to DIY, but others might require a little more expertise. If you give us a call, we can help give you some advice on how to move forward.

We service all types of docks and are always happy to work with you on your repair needs—for both commercial and residential waterfront properties. Let us be your go-to dock company! Send us a message, and we’ll be happy to answer your questions.

What’s the Best Anchoring for My Dock?

A good dock anchoring system is a requirement for every dock owner.  That’s what keeps your structure secure and steady from season to season! Whether you’re just starting out with a new dock or you need to make some upgrades to your current setup, looking at your anchoring system is a key part of having a safe waterfront site.

Types of Dock Anchoring Systems

When you don’t have the right dock anchoring in place, you might be looking at trouble down the road. Identifying the best dock anchoring system for you will depend on your water level, conditions, and existing structure. Here’s a closer look at your options:

1. Pipe Brackets

Smaller docks can often rely on a standard pipe anchoring system. These setups even work for simple PWC lifts. The pipe brackets should be able to move along with water fluctuation, wind, or waves, and the poles themselves are driven right into the lake bottom. Typically, this type of dock anchoring is used on sites with moderate conditions.

2. Piling Brackets

Larger docks designed for heavy loads and high traffic usually turn to pile anchoring. Whether the piles are wood, concrete, or made from another durable material, you can use piling brackets to securely connect your dock.

3. Deadweight Anchoring

If your site experiences more extreme water fluctuations, you might need to look at deadweight anchoring for your dock. These setups use cables or chains to tie your dock to an anchor on the bottom of your lake or body of water. Your deadweight brackets and the option for a deadweight insert and cable winch can help make this anchoring system more reliable for your site.

4. Stiff-Arm Brackets

Some docks have the option to anchor to the shore. Working with stiff-arm brackets lets you stabilize your dock with a shoreline post or shoreline abutment. You can choose from a heavy-duty or light-duty anchoring parts. Depending on your needs, you may also want to add a cable system for extra support.

Need Help with Your Dock Anchor?

Dealing with dock anchor problems can be devastating. If you can’t confidently rely on your setup, then you might end up losing your dock after a storm, or worse. There can be real safety risks when your dock is unstable. A secure dock anchoring system can help keep you and your family safe. For commercial sites, limiting your liability is also a big motivator.

Whether you need a dock safety review or know you’re due for upgrades, our team at Deaton’s Waterfront Services can help. We understand the anchoring features that matter most for different waterfront sites and can recommend the solution that’s right for you. Let’s get your dock repairs taken care of before any accidents happen. Give us a call at (317) 747-4933 to start your consultation. We’re here to help!

Turn Your Floating Dock into the “Go-To” Summer Spot

Having a well-maintained floating dock isn’t just a benefit for you and your immediate family—it can be a great summertime go-to for all of your friends and extended family, too! If you want to make your property the “life of the party” for summer fun, just follow these tips. Making great memories is easy when you’ve got the right equipment and know-how.

Tip No. 1: Plan for a Crowd

When you want to host the big summer bashes, you’ve got to make sure you have enough seating and places to lounge. Planning for a crowd can help you give everyone a place to kick back and relax. Keeping extra chairs on hand makes a big difference. Then, you can pull out whatever seating arrangements you need at a moment’s notice.

While you’re at it, consider stocking up on towels, sunscreen, and even spare sunglasses, too. Stock up on more than just food and drink to really be the “host with the most.” That way, if anyone forgets something at home, you’ll be able to step in with what they need. These little touches will make all of your guests feel welcome.  Once you get these supplies on hand, the only thing missing is just a little music. Everyone is sure to have a great time on your boat,  floating dock, or wherever else when you’ve got all the party basics covered.

Tip No. 2: Use a Team Approach

Of course, you don’t have to do all the planning on your own. Feel free to recruit your guests to lend a hand. Using a team approach encourages everyone to get involved, and consequently, feel more invested in the summertime fun. Let people know ahead of time if they can bring soda or donate some towels to your lake house supplies. (Also note: This sense of community might also help guests feel more invested in keeping your place clean!)

Tip No. 3: Promote Water Safety

The team approach can also extend to your water safety plans. Let your friends and family know that they can keep an eye out for any loose boards on your deck or issues with couplers on your floating dock. Your work gets a lot easier when you have more people involved in checking your equipment. Any problems are sure to get spotted, so you have less to worry about during the waterfront season.

You’ll also need to prepare for other water safety tactics if you have electronics around your floating dock. Hazards around the water can be especially dangerous this time of year, so doing your due diligence to prevent any mishaps will help keep everyone safe. A proper setup is key. If you haven’t worked with a waterfront expert to review your floating dock and other gear, you might consider having a detailed review before your next get-together.  Electric shock drowning is a very real danger on waterfronts, so you’ll want everything up to code.

Floating Dock Design from Deaton’s

When your floating dock needs a little extra attention, you can count on Deaton’s Waterfront Services. While we’re big fans of the EZ Dock products, our expertise stretches to all types of dock systems. So, whether you need minor repairs or a complete overhaul—our team can help you out.

If you’re in our service area, feel free to give us a call at (317) 747-4933 to check our availability. Or, send us a message with some of your concerns and details. We’re always happy to coordinate video conferences with clients so you can get your answers fast, without having to wait for our crew to come to your site. And because we service both residential floating dock and commercial dock setups, we can truly be your one-stop shop. Contact us today to make the most of your waterfront setup!

5 Questions to Ask Before Buying a Lake House

When thinking about buying a lake house, there are a few questions to keep in mind. You don’t want to make such a big decision without considering the most important features. Whether the lake house will become your second home, a rental, your permanent address, or just a place to escape on the weekends, thinking through these details can help you confirm that you’re making the right choice.

1. Is the driving distance reasonable?

You don’t want to commit to a property that’s inconveniently located. Be brutally honest with your calculations on the drive-time. That way, you can avoid the problem of loving a property, but hating the distance it takes to get there.

If you have a few different properties in mind, comparing and contrasting the driving time to each location might help you narrow down your options. Do you want a lake house that’s just an hour away, or can you make do with a trip of 2 or 3 hours? Also consider the traffic. Will you be leaving after work on a Friday? In that case, you might need to add another 30 minutes to your travel plans.

2. What lake house maintenance is required?

Being handy doesn’t necessarily mean you want to have to put in a lot of hard work for your new lake house. A close critique of what’s working and what needs repairing can help you decide whether you want to make an offer on the property.

For example, does the lake house have a boat house or floating dock that needs major dock repairs? If you aren’t sure, you might want to have a waterfront expert come out to do a review of the existing structures. Just like how a home inspector analyzes every corner of a house, a waterfront review can give you valuable information on the structural soundness of a dock or water feature. You don’t want to make the mistake of buying a property without these checks. Otherwise, you might have to foot the bill for an expense seawall repair or other renovation down the road.

3. Do you have access to other amenities?

In addition to counting the miles from the lake house to your permanent address, you’ll also need to study the distance from the lake house to other amenities. How much time are you willing to spend driving to the nearest gas station or grocery store?

Odds are, your full-time home is within close driving distance to everything you need. But your new lake house might have a more remote location. Depending on what your expectations are, you might not be ready to go with an address that’s too far “off the grid.” Think through all the requirements before you move forward with your decision. Do you need a hardware store around the corner? How about a movie theater? What you plan to do at the lake house might help you determine what amenities are necessary, and what are just unnecessary luxuries.

4. Are the lake’s regulations agreeable?

Some lakes that you’re looking at might have strict regulations as part of their homeowners’ association agreements. If you aren’t sure about these rules upfront, it’s important to double-check with the sellers so nothing gets missed.

Are you going to have the freedom you want at your lake house, or will you have to make some adjustments to your plans based on the HOA regulations? For example, are you going to be able to build your own floating dock close to your shoreline, or are there certain restrictions? Knowing about these potential roadblocks upfront can give you the clarity you need to feel confident in your new place.

5. Can you enjoy the lake house year-round?

While a lake house tends to be most enjoyable during the summer months, you’ll want to make sure your investment has year-round appeal. Assuming you can’t get on the water in the winter, will you have other reasons to utilize your property during the “off season?”

A lake house has to hold up to other measures that just being near the water. The inside of your home is equally important. That’s why you’ll want to do a careful walk-through all around the property. Can you see the potential to enjoy the space during the holiday season? Are the views nice enough that you’d still want to visit even if you can’t go out on your boat? Making sure you’ve got the total package will be a great benefit to you and your family. After all, you don’t want your new space to go to waste!

Managing Safety Hazards on Public Waterfronts

Getting ready to enjoy another year on the water is always an exciting time. But you don’t want to overlook the proper safety protocols! Public waterfronts and commercial docks need to be especially careful about their equipment. Regular dock maintenance checks and being able to make necessary repairs quickly can help make the difference between a safe site and a tragic waterfront accident.

Waterfront safety hazards can be easily prevented when you work with the right experts. Here at Deaton’s Waterfront Services, we love helping boat launches and docks on public lakes, reservoirs, and other commercial waterfronts stay up to code. Two types of problems in particular can be a big cause for concern.

Accessibility on Commercial Docks

Our public parks and recreational areas are an invaluable part of our country, and a real source of enjoyment for so many people. In order to protect these sites and help make them available for everyone, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) was signed into law in 1990. These standards cover fishing piers, floating structures, and other local or state facilities.

To be recognized as ADA-compliant dock, both fixed and floating waterfront structures need to be wheelchair-accessible. This helps ensure that people of all abilities can utilize public docks. Sites of all sizes—from small lakes to large marinas—are held accountable. Commercial docks and other public facilities need to pay special attention to these requirements, but sometimes certain features get overlooked.

If you ever need help maintaining your own ADA-compliant dock, just contact Deaton’s Waterfront Services. Our experienced team understands the importance of having accessible ramps, guardrails, curbing on the walkways, and other features for dock safety. We’re always happy to review your site to make sure it meets or exceeds the ADA standards.

Electrical Safety for Waterfronts

Public waterfronts also need to keep a close eye on their electronics. As we look forward to the summer season on the water, it’s important to remember that safety risks can exist anywhere on a dock or marina. Electrical hazards are especially dangerous for waterfronts. Marine industries have to work hard to protect the public against these concerns, but often, there’s a lot left to check.

While some regulations are already in place, electrical safety still makes headlines. Large conferences around the county address marina electrical safety every year—and for good reason. These types of waterfronts often work with a lot of electricity on and around the dock. If these electronics aren’t grounded properly, people swimming in the harbor can be at risk for electric shock drowning. The electrical systems for big marinas and around public lakes definitely need to be up to code. If you aren’t certain that everything is an order, you’re probably due for a dock inspection.

Talking with a waterfront services company can help you verify your dock’s safety features. In other situations, though, you might need to bring a marine electrician to your site. Regularly testing your setup can keep your guests safe.

Get Your Dock Up to Code

If you want to minimize the safety hazards on your public dock or waterfront, Deaton’s Waterfront Services can help. We have experience working with docks of all sizes. When you aren’t sure if your site is up to code, give our team a call at (317) 747-4933. We can either send someone to your location for an in-person tour, or schedule a video call to review your current setup.

Some of the best ways to make your site safe and secure are pretty easy to do. Make sure your wheelchair ramps are at the right angle, and update your rails and curbing to protect visitors from accidents.  A review of your existing electrical equipment is also important this time of year. For a truly successful season, don’t ignore waterfront safety. Partner with Deaton’s Waterfront Servicers to keep your site up to code and ADA-compliant all year long!

Mother Nature

Mother Nature (vs) Waterfront Equipment

When engineering or designing a waterfront system, multiple factors are taken in to account to make sure the system works flawlessly in the short term, and the long term.
Factors such as:
• Wind Load
• Snow Load
• Earth Shifting
• Sink Holes
• Ice
• Temperature
All should be considered when planning the docking structure, and accessories such as ports, lifts, kayak launches, slides, ladders, and other amenities.
With our 30 plus years of experience we can verify, and ensure worry free installations that are on the
Waterfront. This includes docks, walls, and boat lifts. Lets take a look at the different components of boat docks, and boat lifts that need to be factored in with weather.
Boat Docks:
A.) – Floating Boat Docks: Any floating dock can carry “X” amount of weight. The maximum weight that can be carried or supported will be rated by the buoyancy that is underneath the frame and decking. Typically we like to see at least a buoyancy of #25-95 pounds of live load per square foot. Live load is the optimal buoyancy you can maintain across the square footage of your floating platform that’s on the water. The floats are the largest factor you need to consider, most floatation over time will develop lack of optimal buoyancy. This contributes to the dock losing freeboard. “Freeboard “is the measurement from the water line to the top of the dock. Measured freeboard of a floating boat dock depends on the usage, or watercraft that will be using it. Typical freeboard is from 5”- 40”, Deaton’s Waterfront Services can help you measure the recommended proper freeboard.
B.) Stationary Boat Docks: Stationary Dock structures are anchored by having poles, pilings, or supports being driven or anchored into the bottom of the lake bottom. This is a nice and stable way for installation, that creates a solid platform. The biggest worry to this dock is ice/ landshift. If the anchors or pilings settle or get shifted with ice or land movement this will cause the dock to be unlevel, and dangerous to use. There are ways to combat this by using bubblers, water attueators, or have shoreline stabilization installed. A lot of this can be overcome by doing some core samplings of the soil, and making sure to take the necessary measures.

If you have any other questions on this subject, feel free to reach out. Deatons Waterfront Services, 317.747.4934, sales@deatonsdocks.com, www.deatonsdocks.com, or 215 South Madison, Fortvillle, IN 46040. Estimates are free for Boat Docks, Boat Lifts, and Sea Walls! _DEBO_

Dock Repair Prevention with Spring Maintenance

As residential and commercial waterfronts are getting ready for the spring season, there are a few key things dock owners need to watch. It’s a lot easier to enjoy your time on the water when you know that your equipment checks out. Just follow our checklist to confirm that your dock made it through the winter safe and sound.

Signs Your Dock Needs Maintenance

Early spring is the best time to check out your dock to make sure you’re ready for the upcoming season. February, March, or early April, are good times for assessing your waterfront.  Plus, if you used a bubbler in the winter to actuate the water, now’s the perfect time to take it out and put it back into storage.

Checking your dock in early spring is a good idea for both commercial waterfronts and residential properties. Homeowners, public docks, and other commercial sites on the water want to make sure their dock is safe for the years ahead. Regularly scanning your dock for loose connections and keeping an ear out for loud noises around your dock can help you catch any issues long before any major repairs are needed.

One sure sign that your dock will need spring maintenance is if you hear any obvious, loud noises when waves hit your dock. This is cause for concern because that racket could relate to metal-on-metal activity. If your dock equipment is knocking around too much, something can eventually break off and fall in the water.

Common Springtime Dock Repairs

In the Midwest, ice on the waterfronts typically comes off around Valentine’s Day. Scheduling preventative maintenance with a waterfront services company can help verify that all of your equipment survived the winter in one piece. If anything did go wrong, spring storms will just make those waterfront problems worse. Without preventative maintenance, some docks can even break in half. Then those parts can either sink to the bottom, or float away and go over a dam.

Some of the most common springtime dock repair problems relate to anchoring. Checking each one of your anchors, cables, and pipes is key for having a sturdy, stable dock. Spring is also the time to take a look at any floats that sit underneath your dock for support. These floats can sometimes pop out during winter, which can cause the dock to fall into the water later on. A thorough check will also cover the connections between your dock and bridge. These parts may need to be tighten every now and again, and spring is definitely the time to check.

Getting a Dock Repair Quote

A dock repair will happen at just about every site eventually. But if you’ve completed the necessary preventative maintenance, these problems are pretty easy to address. In general, the same rules apply to the small lakes in Northern Indiana, as to the huge lakes Kentucky or Tennessee!

If you need a professional to weigh in on your dock setup, you can always count on Deaton’s Waterfront Services. We take care with each dock inspection so you can get the information you need to make an informed decision. First, we review any weak points on your dock and let you know if there are any possibilities of failure in the next year. Then we can share suggestions on updates, as well as any short-term or long-term tips that might be helpful for your site.

A lot of times, you don’t even need to schedule an on-site visit with us. So if you’re on fence about whether you need a dock repair, please don’t hesitate to give Deaton’s Waterfront Services a call. We can easily get a clear vantage point of your site with a quick video-call. That way, you’ll get all the suggestions you need (whether you need new floats added, more screws down, etc.) and a dock repair quote with a much faster turn-around time.

You can even send us pictures of your dock to talk over your options. Our crew at Deaton’s is always happy to provide you with recommendations for custom dock updates or other repairs. We can even send you links and images to other dock projects we’ve worked on with past clients. Getting maintenance is great for your peace of mind around the water. If you have any questions, be sure to send us a message. We hope you have a great season ahead of you!

What to Check for a Winter-Ready Dock

When the temperatures start to drop, it makes sense to plan for winter. Preparing your dock should be just as important as making your other home arrangements. You want to make sure everything is in order before the real frost, snow, and ice set in. A little planning will help protect your dock through the elements—and give you a jumpstart to getting back on the water in the spring and summer.

Dock Winterization Tips and Maintenance

Organizing your waterfront property for winter isn’t always a fun task, but it’s an important process if your equipment is going to last. The general maintenance checks you do now can help you feel confident that your waterfront is prepped for any ice or harsh weather coming this season.

  • Check for loose bolts/connectors
  • Remove any ladders or ramps
  • Inspect boards for cracks
  • Tie a safety line (for floating docks)

Typically, dock owners can manage these steps on their own. But some cases may require a dock professional on site. If anything looks out of the ordinary with the items listed above, it’s probably time to call in the experts. Your dock might be in need of repairs before the fluctuating water depths and freezing temperatures do more damage.

Protecting Different Types of Docks

Depending on your dock type, you might need to complete a few other winterization steps. Following these general winterization tips is always a good idea as a minimum precaution. To really get specific about what your particular dock needs, pay attention to its material. Different dock types require their own winterization prep.

Stationary Docks

For the most part, permanent docks are designed to hold up against the winter elements. If your dock setup is in a protected area like a marina or cove, you’ll be just fine to leave your dock as-is for the winter. Lakes that are ½ mile across, however, may need to remove their docks for the winter. Open water between the dock and shoreline can cause problems throughout the season, so you’ll likely be better off removing the equipment from the water to protect it until spring.

Wooden Docks

Wooden docks often require more maintenance throughout the year. Fall and winter are no exception. As the weather starts to cool, it’s important to take time to inspect your dock’s sealant. If the boards can’t repel any water droplets, or you know the stain or sealant hasn’t been managed for a few years, it’s well worth it to do some touch-up work before the snow hits. Sand and re-seal any areas of your dock that look splintered, or just re-do the entire dock. Adding a layer of protection against the elements will help the equipment last and guard it against costly repairs and deterioration.

EZ Floating Docks

Docks made with materials like the EZ Dock systems are really great for winter-prep. (That’s one of the reasons we love working with their products!) Unless your dock is located on a river or other un-protected area, there’s really no reason to do anything special for your dock winterization. It can stay just like it is. EZ Dock panels only require a couple inches of water to float, so you don’t need to worry about damaging the underside of your dock. Plus, they hold up fine with ice. Most floating docks can move just fine with ice movements on lakes when they are not anchored—just remember to tie your safety line to a tree or other solid object on shore.

Need Help with Your Dock?

Reaching out to a waterfront company this time of year is an easy way to get ready for winter and the new year. Making plans for a new seawall installation or updated boat lift doesn’t have to wait until spring. In fact, finalizing those details during the colder months will let you jump right in to your new gear when the days warm up again. If you’ve got a project on the backburner, consider making some headway now. Then you can be ready to go for the entire waterfront season.

The team at Deaton’s Waterfront Services is proud to work with residential and commercial clients throughout the Midwest. We travel throughout Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky, Ohio, and Tennessee. If you need any help with your winterizing your dock, please don’t hesitate to give us a call at (317) 747-4933 or message Deaton’s Waterfront Services to get started.

Our dock and waterfront professionals are available year-round for project consultations and design work. We know you have dreams for your waterfront property. Let us help you make them a reality.

The Purpose of Seawalls and Waterfront Maintenance

Seawalls work on a variety of waterfront issues. They help facilitate proper drainage, work to prevent flooding, and are a great line of defense against erosion.

The most common seawalls are made from either steel sheet piling or rip rap (or some combination of the two). Steel sheet seawalls provide a great durability and help establish a mixed-use area above the shoreline. Rip rap, on the other hand, offers a more natural look. These types of stone barriers create a gradual transition from the land to the waterline. Both types of seawalls can work great on residential or commercial property, but only if they’re properly maintained.

Waterfront Protection and Seawalls

Lots of property owners opt for a seawall because they like the finished look it gives their waterfront. In addition to helping maintain your own property, seawalls can also benefit the shoreline in a some other important ways:

  • Helps maintain proper water depth
  • Works to stabilize the shoreline
  • Adds an attractive transition area for property
  • Provides mixed habitat for local wildlife

Of the two seawall types, rip rap create more variations in shoreline depth. This helps animals like fish and turtles get the environment they need to thrive. But for marinas that experience a lot of boat traffic, steel sheet piling seawalls tend to be best. While these designs aren’t as helpful to the local wildlife, their durability provides an ideal solution for stabilizing waterfront areas that can’t utilize rip rap alone.

Common Problems with Seawalls

Whether you have a seawall on your residential property or the structure was built on a commercial lot or community park, the questions about maintenance are often the same. In general, seawall maintenance is relatively slim. Checking the structure a couple times per year (as well as after major storms) will help you keep an eye on how it’s holding up. Yet, because seawalls don’t usually require much upkeep, a lot of people will forget to inspect them.

Hands down, the number one thing working against your seawall is time. While the seawalls are put in place to prevent waterfront erosion, they can’t stop it entirely. It’s only natural for years of erosion  to disrupt your seawall’s stability. For rip rap seawalls, the most noticeable issues will be dislodged stones, or a general slumping of the barrier. The concerns with steel sheet seawalls can be more complex.

Some of the most common problems people will notice for steel seawalls include: leaks and cracks, corrosion, joint separation between panels, and outward bowing. Any sections that appear misshapen can be a cause for concern. It’s also a red flag if the land near your seawall is showing pits or sinkhole formations. This could be a sign that the wall may be breached or cracked in an area you can’t see. If that happens, heavy rainfall or other water may be drain through the wall itself and cause further damage.

It helps to realize that seawalls don’t last forever. A number of factors can affect your structure’s stability. Good seawall installation is of the utmost importance, but if you’re starting to see some wear and tear, it’s best to act sooner rather than later. Working with a quality waterfront contractor will help you assess the damage and complete repairs, as needed. The right crew should be able to repair seawall cracks or even re-install the seawall footer if the damage is serious enough.

Deaton’s Seawall Construction and Seawall Repair

A good seawall should be built to last, but every waterfront will experience its own set of changes over the years. If you think your seawall has seen better days, contact the experts at Deaton’s Waterfront Services to come take a closer look. We’re proud to handle seawall repairs, as well as new seawall construction services for Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky, Ohio, and Tennessee.

Please don’t hesitate to give us a call at (317) 747-4933 if you have any questions about our seawall services. We’d be happy to go over any concerns you have before scheduling an on-site visit. Seawalls should be an asset to your property. At Deaton’s Waterfront Services, we’ll help you keep them that way!

Pitfalls with Used Dock Equipment—and How to Avoid Them

Buying waterfront property is a great when you love spending time on the water. Having a dock already installed can be really convenient, too. But try not to get ahead of yourself. Just because there’s water and a dock, the property may not be the best fit for your lifestyle.

Home inspections help tell you whether the house you’re looking at is structurally sound and built to code. Checking out a property’s used dock equipment works the same way. When you’re aware of the possible problems you can get with used docks, it’s a lot easier to save yourself from financial upsets—or even safety hazards—down the road. You might be in for a rough ride if the dock wasn’t installed properly.

Check for Dock Damage

It’s normal to do a home tour when you’re thinking of buying a new property, so don’t skip out on walking the used dock. Dock equipment ages just like anything else around your property. You’re looking for two things in the beginning: rot and rust. Noticing either of these signs could mean long-term trouble for your waterfront.

Used wood docks can develop rot for any number of reasons. The planks might not have been treated properly, the wood could be poor quality, or it’s just been neglected for too long. Because wood rot can spread, it’s important to take care of the issue early on. The same goes for rust. Metal supports or other components that appear to have rust may jeopardize the integrity of the structure. With enough damage, the dock may not be safe enough to use. Seeing either rot or rust should definitely be a red flag.

Professional Dock Inspection

Whether or not you see rust or rot problems, you might still consider taking a closer look at the dock equipment. A professional waterfront specialist can come out with the proper equipment to assess the durability and construction of the dock from every angle. It’s a great way to get true peace of mind before making an offer or purchase.

For starters, a professional dock inspection will let you know whether the support beams on a stationary dock have any problems with warping or cracks. These supports need to be strong if the dock is going to survive long-term use. Any indications of damage might lead to bigger safety issues.

Buyers should also be aware of the risks of foundation deterioration or sand band erosion around waterfront properties. Hiring a waterfront expert can help give you an unbiased opinion of the dock’s surroundings. Again, like home inspections, a dock inspection will offer you an in-depth analysis of the structure. If you’re going to make a well-informed decision about a new property or dock, you’ll want to have all the facts. They’ll either point out a couple concerns, or tell you it’s good to go!

Deaton’s Waterfront Services

You may have fallen in love with a waterfront view, but if the dock is severely damaged, you might need to think twice about making an offer. Will the dock last well into the future? Are you willing to pay for dock repairs? The structure needs to be stable and secure for you to truly enjoy life on the water. Talking with a dock expert can help you decide ahead of time whether the setup is right for you.

For more information or to schedule your own dock inspection, you can always call on Deaton’s Waterfront Services. We’re proud to serve the waterfront needs of Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, Illinois, and Tennessee. Contact us today to get started!